Virgilio Piñera: “The Great Whore”

Virgilio Pinera

 

The Great Whore

for Oscar Hurtado

 

 

When in 1937 my family arrived in Havana

—one exodus of many we were used to—

my father—as was his blood’s custom—

gave himself a few slaps and began his cursing.

They arrived exactly at ten in the morning

on an August day wet with vinegar:

before going to wait for the Santiago-to-Havana,

I drank papaya juice on Lagunas and Galiano, 

and because duty trumps desire, 

I gave the slip to a negro signaling me with his hands.

 

I was twenty-five then

and my whole life was summed up in my stare;

those were botched years because hunger doesn’t pay:

“Virgilio—Oscar Zaldívar would say—

You don’t eat enough. One must eat meat …”

Now and then he’d take me to La Genovesa

on the tormented corner of Virtudes and Prado,

where Panchita, an Italian in the know,

called Oscar “doctor” and said nothing to me.

The streets were dizzy spells; the sidewalks were faintings:

verses in my head and cramps in my stomach.

I’d run to the pawn shop on Amistad and Animas

looking to be hanged among its dozens of guitars,

I, hocked, hocking one of Osvaldo’s old suits

to climb, panting, the Auditorium’s casserole dish

and see Moliere’s The Miser presented by Luis Jouvet.

 

This was a Havana of streetcars and soldiers

in yellow khaki, getting through the end of the month

on the pesos of homosexuals;

among whom, in a certain manner, I count myself,

that is, in my humble way: I do not dare place myself

alongside the Marquise Eulalia, Green Bird,

Little Chinese Vase, Lyric Flea, and the Marquis

of Pinar del Rio, and though one night at the Don Quijote

I danced dressed like a snake on a table,

my boasting pales before the magnificence

of Green Bird consenting to have his throat slit in the bathroom. 

 

Seen a certain way they were heroic times, times

sung about by drunk guitars,

tremendous words pronounced

with the edge of a knife, while over

on Marte and Belona, dancers enacted

the confused gesture of a bloody danzón.

This feat reached epic proportions

in the Knife of San Miguel: there, Panchitín Díaz

would say with his flute of a voice to each little debutante whore:

“Girl, you have all your life in front of you…”,

and taking two steps he’d go into the barbershop on Neptuno

to engage in a high-wire dialogue

with big-girl Albertino, there to be shaved

of an imaginary beard.

 

One night in El Prado, with its piece of sky

particularly agitated above the green bronze lions,

above the lions that trembled at the steps of the

Emperor of the World – a tubercular negro with

a constellation of Coca Cola bottle caps on his chest –

people spoke of, with manifest terror,

the Ciceronian phrase of the woman who threw herself

under the wheels of Lily Hidalgo de Conill’s car:

“Havana, open up and swallow me!”

But Havana became even more rigid

so she could get to Colón without potholes,

so that night the venereal whores

could make a few good pesos, so the

sentimental ones could cry, among whom I count myself,

to the extreme that I could be named president of

all sentimental people, and precisely now I remember

the man I saw murdered next to the Zenea statue

gripping with his shaking hand the marble breast

of the woman who eternally accompanies him.

I thought the Apocalypse had come,

but just at that moment I heard, “Roasted peanuts, peanuts!”

and before my eyes swamped with tears

was thrust a paper cone of Cuban voluptuousness. 

 

My friend, Living Dead, a French whore

who washed up in Sagua around the year twenty-four

would buy the paper every day to

see if the Red Chronicle would reveal as dead

the asshole, she said, who left her stranded in Sagua.

But because life calls the shots, she kept opening her legs

without sentimentality of any sort.

I, my destiny as a poet an impediment to my whore-work,

dreamt persistently about opening mine:

when hunger squeezes, monstrous dreams

would appear in every corner, coins the size of

a house fell on me, and everything ended

with a fritter swallowed to the beat of

“The Cat’s Mustache is a great guy …”

Nevertheless, I thought about immortality

with the same persistence I was accosted

by mortality, because even when I found myself

forced to listen to “the immortality of the crab”

and to watch the pale man sitting in the café on

the first floor of my building, with a toothpick in his

teeth and a glass of water on the table

thinking his fantasies over, I clung

to the pious lie, following at the same time,

with my eyes, the porkleg sandwiches

grinding in my intestines. 

 

Suaritos would announce Small-Suit Ñico;

Black Toña would break the moon with her Mexican dyke’s

voice; Batista threw coups

in Columbia; Patricia the American mummified herself

in a record; and Daniel Santos galvanized the slums.

Of course, in this city constantly in the sun

ghosts were used to appearing in full light:

I’ve seen them keeping me company by Monte and Cárdenas

the day of Menocal’s funeral, full of fighting rum,

because that’s what the General frittered and soaked and anesthetized with,

and champagne for himself and Marianita in Paris.

“Dear—Little Chinese Vase said to me—today the whole world

is drunk, we’ll put together a wild-haired gang,

the General has fucked his thing and we’ll die

with a great big hunk of daddy inside.”

In fact that’s how he died: a destiny fulfilled,

a life realized, a hairy chest strip-tease,

taking out washbasins of ass water.

When they took him away, there was a cold front

three pairs of balls nasty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are the monuments we’ll never see in

our plazas, amorphous, yes, an amorphous abundance

from which I extract my song, anywhere,

going down Carlos III, which had benches then,

squalid, trembling, with my loving Havana

following my steps like a docile dog,

among fallen years rumbling like cannons,

leaving my peseta in the card-reader’s house

to learn … to learn ? whether tomorrow I’ll reach

the easy life … A haircut in the Unico Market,

sugar-cane juice in the Polvorin Market,

always moving forward, in a fight to the death,

searching for completion like one searches for a poem.

Oh endless streets, oh sidewalks perfumed

with urine! Oh squires with handkerchiefs

impregnated with Guerlain, you who never

paid for a house to keep me in.

 

Alone in my bedsit making my little poems

I saw Havana flow by like a river of blood:

and just like one more of Colón’s whores
I counted them at midnight as if they were pesos.

 

 

(1960)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Gran Puta

Para Oscar Hurtado

 

Cuando en 1937 mi familia llegó a La Habana 

uno de los tantos éxodos a que estábamos acostumbrados 

mi padre –como tenía por costumbre sanguínea 

se dio de galletas y se puso a echar carajos. 

Llegaron exactamente a las diez de la mañana

de un día de agosto mojado con vinagre; 

antes de ir a esperar el Santiago-Habana 

tomé un jugo de papaya en Lagunas y Galiano, 

y como el deber se impone al deseo

perdí a un negro que me hacía señas con la mano. 

 

Por esa época yo tenía veinticinco años

y toda la vida resumida en la mirada; 

años mal llevados porque el hambre no paga: 

“Virgilio —me decía Oscar Zaldívar 

no te alimentas lo suficiente. Hay que comer carne…” 

De vez en cuando me llevaba a La Genovesa

en la esquina atormentada de Virtudes y Prado, 

donde Panchita, una italiana operativa, 

le decía doctor a Oscar y a  no me decía nada. 

Las calles eran vahídos y las aceras desmayos: 

En la cabeza los versos y en el estómago cranque. 

Corría a la casa de empeños sita en Amistad y Ánimas

buscando que me colgaran entre docenas de guitarras, 

yo, empeñado, yo empeñando un saco viejo de Osvaldo 

para trepar jadeante la cazuela del Auditórium

a ver “El Avaro” de Molière que Luis Jouvet presentaba. 

 

Era La Habana con tranvías y con soldados

de kaki amarillo, haciendo el fin de mes

con los pesos de los homosexuales; 

entre los cuales, en cierta manera, me cuento, 

es decir, en mi humilde escala: no osaría ponerme

a la altura de La Marquesa Eulalia, del Pájaro Verde, 

de Jarroncito Chino, de la Pulga Lírica y del Marqués

de Pinar del Río, y aunque una noche, en el Don Quijote, 

bailé sobre una mesa disfrazado de maja, 

mi alarde palidece ante la magnificencia

del Pájaro Verde dejándose degollar en el baño. 

 

 

 

 

Según se mire eran tiempos heroicos, tiempos

que fueran cantados por guitarras alcoholizadas, 

palabras tremendas que eran pronunciadas

con el filo de un cuchillo, mientras allá, 

en Marte y Belona, los bailadores realizaban

la confusa gesta del danzón ensangrentado. 

Esta gesta alcanzaba proporciones épicas

en el Cuchillo de San Miguel: allí Panchitín Díaz 

le decía con su voz aflautada a la putica debutante: 

Muchacha, tienes toda la vida por delante…”, 

y dando dos pasos se metía en la barbería de Neptuno 

para entablar un diálogo funambulesco

con la corpulenta Albertino, que se hacía afeitar

una barba imaginaria. 

 

 

Una noche en El Prado, con su pedazo de cielo

particularmente convulso sobre leones de bronce verde, 

sobre leones que temblaban al paso del 

Emperador del Mundo —un negro tuberculoso con 

el pecho constelado de chapitas de Coca Cola—, 

se comentaba con terror manifiesto

la frase ciceroniana de la mujer que se tiró

bajo las ruedas del automóvil de Lily Hidalgo de Conill: 

“¡Habana, ábrete y trágame!” 

Pero La Habana se hizo aún más rígida

para que ella pudiera ir hasta Colón sin baches, 

para que esa noche las putas chancrosas

hicieran buenos pesos y para que lloraran los

sentimentales, entre los cuales también me cuento, 

al extremo que podría ser nombrado presidente de 

los sentimentales, y ahora precisamente recuerdo

al hombre que vi matar junto a la estatua de Zenea

con su mano convulsa aferrada al seno de mármol

de la mujer que eternamente lo acompaña. 

Me pareció que llegaba el Apocalipsis, 

pero justo en ese momento : “¡Maní tostao, maní!” 

y metían por mis ojos anegados en lágrimas

un cucurucho de voluptuosidad cubana. 

 

Mi amiga, la Muerta Viva, una puta francesa

que recaló en Sagua allá por el veinticuatro

compraba todos los días el periódico para 

ver si en la Crónica Roja aparecía muerto

el cabrón, decía ella, que la dejó plantada en Sagua. 

Pero como la vida manda, seguía abriendo las piernas

sin sentimentalismo de ninguna clase. 

Yo, que mi destino de poeta me impidió la putería

soñaba persistentemente con abrir las mías: 

cuando el hambre aprieta, sueños monstruosos

se perfilaban en cada esquina, monedas del tamaño de 

una casa me caían encima, y todo terminaba

en una frita deglutida al compás de 

Bigote de gato es un gran sujeto…” 

Sin embargo, pensaba en la inmortalidad

con la misma persistencia con que me acosaba

la mortalidad, porque aun cuando viéndome

forzado a escuchar “la inmortalidad del cangrejo 

y ver al tipo pálido sentado en el café de 

los bajos de mi casa, con un palillo en los

dientes y un vaso de agua sobre la mesa 

pensando en las musarañas, yo me aferraba

a la mentira piadosa siguiendo al mismo

tiempo con la vista los sándwiches de pierna

que rechinaban en mis tripas. 

 

Suaritos anunciaba a Ñico Saquito, 

Toña La Negra quebraba la luna con su voz

de tortillera mejicana, Batista daba golpetazos

en Columbia, Patricia la Americana se momificaba

en un disco y Daniel Santos galvanizaba los solares. 

Claro está, en la ciudad del sol constante

los fantasmas acostumbraban salir a plena luz: 

los he visto acompañándome por Monte y Cárdenas 

el día del entierro de Menocal, con ron peleón, 

porque de eso el general prodigó, enchumbó, anestesió

y el champán para él y Marianita en París. 

“Querida, me dijo Jarroncito Chino, hoy todo el mundo

está jalao, haremos ranfla moñuda, 

ya el General templó lo suyo y nosotras moriremos

con un troyó papá bien grande adentro 

Así murió efectivamente. Destino cumplido, 

vida realizada, strip-tease de pelo en pecho, 

sacando palanganas de agua de culo. 

Cuando se la llevaron había un Norte de 

tres pares de cojones. 

 

 

Estos son los monumentos que nunca veremos en

nuestras plazas, amorfa, , amorfa cantidad

de donde extraigo el canto, en cualquier parte, 

bajando por Carlos III que entonces tenía bancos, 

escuálido, tembloroso, con mi amorosa Habana 

siguiéndome los pasos como perro dócil

entre años caídos retumbando como cañones

dejando la peseta en casa de la barajera

para saber ¿para saber? si mañana entraré

en la papa… Un pelado en el Mercado Único, 

un guarapo en el Mercado del Polvorín, 

siempre avanzando, en brecha mortal, 

buscando la completa como se busca un verso, 

¡oh inacabables calles, oh aceras perfumadas

con orine! ¡Oh hacendados con pañuelos

imprednados de Guerlain, que nunca

me pusieron casa! 

 

Solo en mi accesoria haciendo mis versitos

veía pasar La Habana como un río de sangre: 

y como una puta más del barrio de Colón 

los contaba de madrugada como si fueran pesos.

 

 

 

(1960)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s